Street Art – Inspiring Happiness

THE ORIGIN OF STREET ART

Slogans of protest and political or social commentary graffitied onto public walls are the precursor to modern graffiti and street art, and continue as one aspect of the genre. Street art in the form of text or simple iconic graphics in the vein of corporate icons become well-known yet enigmatic symbols of an area or an era.

Some credit the Kilroy Was Here graffiti of the World War II era as one such early example; a simple line-drawing of a long-nosed man peering from behind a ledge.  “Kilroy” graffiti was described as “outrageous not for what it said, but where it turned up”.
Much of what can now be defined as modern street art has well-documented origins dating from New York City‘s graffiti boom, with its infancy in the 1960s, maturation in the 1970s, and peaking with the spray-painted full-car subway train murals of the 1980s centered in the Bronx.

As the 1980s progressed, a shift occurred from text-based works of early in the decade to visually conceptual street art such as Hambleton‘s shadow figures. This period coincides with Keith Haring‘s subway advertisement subversions and Jean-Michel Basquiat‘s SAMO tags.

What is now recognized as “street art” had yet to become a realistic career consideration, and offshoots such as stencil graffiti were in their infancy. Wheatpasted poster art used to promote bands and the clubs where they performed evolved into actual artwork or copy-art and became a common sight during the 1980s in cities worldwide.

Punk rock music’s subversive ideologies were also instrumental to street art’s evolution as an art form during the 1980s. Some of the anti-museum mentality can be attributed to the ideology of Marinetti who in 1909 wrote the “Manifesto of Futurism. Many street artists claim we do not live in a museum so art should be in public places with no tickets.

STREET ART IN DUBAI

Dubai’s started with street art around 2013 – 2016, but it was in 2017 when Dubai Government started a movement where varied and vast public spaces were provided to national and international artists.
There is fabulous locations that you can find from north to south in key spaces.

You can see more information here.

There is multiple fairs and initiatives happening in Dubai every year specially during winter months when the weather is good.

Dubai Canvas is one of the famous and expected 3D street art fair, that happens in different areas of the city every year.
People can enjoy real pieces of art made from the best artists in the world.

In recent years, Dubai has become a hotbed of fantastic street art, with wow-worthy walls from JBR to Satwa. And now Dubai Metro is next in line to get a splash of colour.
The Dubai Metro Murals Project will see two top international street artists transform some of the pillars of the Dubai Metro into masterpieces. The pillars that will be painted are on Sheikh Zayed Road, between Financial Centre and Emirates Towers stations.

According to Brand Dubai, which is behind the project, the themes of the murals have been chosen to “inspire creativity and spread happiness while also reflecting Dubai’s character, vision and future aspirations”.

Peruvian muralist Daniel Cortez, also known as Decertor, is one of the artists who has been chosen for the project. His colourful human portraits can be found on walls in Peru, Colombia, Mexico, Argentina and Morocco.

Dominican-born, Miami-based artist Elio Mercado, known as Evoca1, will also contribute to the project. You might have already seen his work at Al Raha Beach in Abu Dhabi.

The Dubai Metro Murals Project is part of a beautification initiative that aims to transform Dubai into an “open-air museum”. Other beautification projects that will take place over the next three years will cover bridges, tunnels, walking tracks, bus stops and other public facilities and areas.

Brand Dubai said artists from the UAE, the Middle East and around the world would be invited to create public artworks in the city.
Credit to What’s On

I can’t wait to see the new creations!

I see Street Art as a way of expression, as a way to create feelings and memories.

What do you think about Street Art?

I leave here a great reportage of Barcelona Street Art!

Sushi: What it is and how to eat it!

The history of sushibegan around the 8th century in Japan. The original type of sushi was first developed in Southeast Asia as a means of preserving fish in fermented rice, so they used to salt the fish and wrap it in fermented rice to preserve it, as there was no refrigeration.

In the Muromachi period, people began to eat the rice as well as the fish, this new way of consuming fish was no longer a form of preservation but rather a new dish in Japanese cuisine.

During the Edo period, vinegar than lacto-fermentation was used to sour the rice, so both rice and fish could be consumed at the same time, and the dish became unique to Japanese culture.

Nowadays you can find Sushi all over the world, from street fast food restaurants to the most refined and selected restaurants where starred Michelin chefs cook for you, but do you know which is the original way to eat sushi? And do you know the difference between the sushi types ?

Here I’m sharing with you some good tips about the above.

BASIC TYPES OF SUSHI

Sashimi: Very thin raw fish or seafood without rice.

Nigiri: “hand pressed sushi” consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that the chef presses between the palms of the hands to form an oval-shaped ball, and a topping (the neta) draped over the ball. It is usually served with a bit of wasabi; neta are typically fish such as salmon, tuna or other seafood.

Maki: “rolled sushi” is a cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat known as a makisu . Makizushi is generally wrapped in nori (seaweed), but is occasionally wrapped in a thin omelette, soy paper, cucumber, or shiso (perilla) leaves. Makizushi is usually cut into six or eight pieces, which constitutes a single roll order.

Uramaki: “inside-out roll”  is a medium-sized cylindrical piece with two or more fillings, and was developed as a result of the creation of the California roll, as a method originally meant to hide the nori. Uramaki differs from other makimono because the rice is on the outside and the nori inside. The filling is in the center surrounded by nori, then a layer of rice, and optionally an outer coating of some other ingredients such as roe or toasted sesame seeds. It can be made with different fillings, such as tuna, crab meat, avocado, mayonnaise, cucumber or carrots.

Temaki: “hand roll”  is a large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. For optimal taste and texture, temaki must be eaten quickly after being made because the nori cone soon absorbs moisture from the filling and loses its crispness, making it somewhat difficult to bite through. For this reason, the nori in pre-made or take-out temaki is sealed in plastic film which is removed immediately before eating.

I personally love Sashimi, as you can enjoy the full flavour of the raw fish, but of course, the quality has to be top TOP !

Here I share with you a clear and fantastic picture of how to eat sushi, I’m sure you will discover things that you didn’t know before!

I hope you enjoyed this post and that will be helpful for you to order is your next visit to a Sushi Restaurant!

Which is your favourite sushi?

My recommended Sushi Restaurants in Dubai.

3 Fills tuna and uni imported from Japan every Wednesday, the sashimi is my favourite in town, amazing place, staff and chef!

Tomo located in Raffles hotel, the head chef is Japanese and the Nigiri is delicious!

Zuma located in DIFC, a fine dining experience with premium products.

Nobu in Atlantis the Palm a world class brand ! Stunning venue and food.

Okku a contemporary Japanese Restaurant.

Sikka Art Fair 2018

This beautiful fair, takes place every year in Al Fahidi Historical Neighbourhood in the heart of Bur Dubai, Old city side by the Creek.

Under the patronage of Her Highness Sheikha Latifa bint Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum‪,‬Vice Chairman of Dubai Culture & Arts Authority, the contemporary, artist-led fair provides a platform for emerging UAE-based and GCC talents‪, in‬ a vibrant 10‪-‬day programme featuring exciting exhibitions, art installations, workshops, film, and music‪.‬

SIKKA complements the city-wide activation of cultural events that takes place during the fifth edition of Dubai Art Season, which runs throughout March and April 2018 and feature events such as the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature, Art Dubai, DIFC Art Nights and the Middle East Film & Comic Con, among hundreds of other initiatives.

I visited Sikka twice, as it’s big and requires attention if you really want to enjoy an understand the artists.

I will mention 2 of my favourite spots but I truly enjoyed the whole fair.

  1. Tamashee Saudi House.

    Tamashee, is a high-end Arabian Gulf footwear brand based in Dubai. The brand began as a set of social goals which are now the core values for all of its work.

     

    They setup a beautiful house representing a journey of different forms of contemporary art in Saudi Arabia.
    From beautiful paints to photography and live art, the whole exhibition was in harmony with their brand and colours as their products have been inspired by research of cultural designs and patterns. Tamashee carefully studies the history, form, and function of each cultural design and revives certain key elements of the past through its products.

     


  2. Mawaheb Art Studio

    Mawaheb from Beautiful People is a Dubai-based art studio for adults with special needs, now known as ‘the determined ones’ following a directive by His Highness Sheikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubais).

    The students from 16 years and above bring out the best of their creativity and create beautiful pieces of art full of meaning and imagination!

    They prepared an amazing exhibition for Sikka called: Life is Beautiful !
    All the paints and sculptures had strong messages of #strength, #happiness, #freedom, #art and #culture.
    You could find small little sculpture persons all around the neigbourhood inviting you to discover them in their house!

    I’m sharing with you some of their paints, but if you really want to visit them you can do it on Weekdays from 9am to 2pm and have a great coffee from the hand of the students! Follow them in Instagram ! @mawahebdubai  

As you can see, life is beautiful and more when is full of

COLORS, ART AND FUN !