Sushi: What it is and how to eat it!

The history of sushibegan around the 8th century in Japan. The original type of sushi was first developed in Southeast Asia as a means of preserving fish in fermented rice, so they used to salt the fish and wrap it in fermented rice to preserve it, as there was no refrigeration.

In the Muromachi period, people began to eat the rice as well as the fish, this new way of consuming fish was no longer a form of preservation but rather a new dish in Japanese cuisine.

During the Edo period, vinegar than lacto-fermentation was used to sour the rice, so both rice and fish could be consumed at the same time, and the dish became unique to Japanese culture.

Nowadays you can find Sushi all over the world, from street fast food restaurants to the most refined and selected restaurants where starred Michelin chefs cook for you, but do you know which is the original way to eat sushi? And do you know the difference between the sushi types ?

Here I’m sharing with you some good tips about the above.

BASIC TYPES OF SUSHI

Sashimi: Very thin raw fish or seafood without rice.

Nigiri: “hand pressed sushi” consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that the chef presses between the palms of the hands to form an oval-shaped ball, and a topping (the neta) draped over the ball. It is usually served with a bit of wasabi; neta are typically fish such as salmon, tuna or other seafood.

Maki: “rolled sushi” is a cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat known as a makisu . Makizushi is generally wrapped in nori (seaweed), but is occasionally wrapped in a thin omelette, soy paper, cucumber, or shiso (perilla) leaves. Makizushi is usually cut into six or eight pieces, which constitutes a single roll order.

Uramaki: “inside-out roll”  is a medium-sized cylindrical piece with two or more fillings, and was developed as a result of the creation of the California roll, as a method originally meant to hide the nori. Uramaki differs from other makimono because the rice is on the outside and the nori inside. The filling is in the center surrounded by nori, then a layer of rice, and optionally an outer coating of some other ingredients such as roe or toasted sesame seeds. It can be made with different fillings, such as tuna, crab meat, avocado, mayonnaise, cucumber or carrots.

Temaki: “hand roll”  is a large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. For optimal taste and texture, temaki must be eaten quickly after being made because the nori cone soon absorbs moisture from the filling and loses its crispness, making it somewhat difficult to bite through. For this reason, the nori in pre-made or take-out temaki is sealed in plastic film which is removed immediately before eating.

I personally love Sashimi, as you can enjoy the full flavour of the raw fish, but of course, the quality has to be top TOP !

Here I share with you a clear and fantastic picture of how to eat sushi, I’m sure you will discover things that you didn’t know before!

I hope you enjoyed this post and that will be helpful for you to order is your next visit to a Sushi Restaurant!

Which is your favourite sushi?

My recommended Sushi Restaurants in Dubai.

3 Fills tuna and uni imported from Japan every Wednesday, the sashimi is my favourite in town, amazing place, staff and chef!

Tomo located in Raffles hotel, the head chef is Japanese and the Nigiri is delicious!

Zuma located in DIFC, a fine dining experience with premium products.

Nobu in Atlantis the Palm a world class brand ! Stunning venue and food.

Okku a contemporary Japanese Restaurant.

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